Working at a Nonprofit — Tips

Thinking about working for a nonprofit?  This sector is an important segment of the US economy with the Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting that in 2014 nonprofits accounted for 11.4 million jobs, 10.3 percent of all private sector employment. So, there are jobs out there within the nonprofit world, but it’s important to note some cultural issues that generally apply to most jobs within this sector. The fact that nonprofits don’t care about profits creates certain differences in the workplace that may not be that obvious.

Here are some pointers about the nonprofit environment to consider:

Supportive environment

While the for-profit business expects employees to be outgoing, ambitious, go-getters, the nonprofit organization looks for employees to get along, to be part of a team. To this end, nonprofits’ employees may receive more hand-holding and more support than in other environments.  Also, the workplace is likely to be more flexible and less formal with good benefits and time-off policies. This type of culture is suitable for those who want to be part of something bigger than themselves and value team processes and causes over personal ambitions.

More time to make decisions

Decisions, including major ones, are made in a team setting, built on consensus. Although there are a structure and managers, teamwork and team decisions are the norms. This means that many decisions take a long time to be made,  after meetings and considerations. Compared to the for-profit model, the nonprofit is more democratic, but it comes with the price of things moving at a slower pace. This can be frustrating for those used to the for-profit world, but it can also give you the opportunity to be heard.

External forces

Nonprofits usually depend on donors and grantors to operate and any changes within these groups can affect the organization in unexpected and swift ways. Employees need to change priorities quickly and to adapt to a new situation regardless of what the boss said just a few days before. This can be disconcerting and stressful to many, so employees need to be flexible and calm. If you’re looking for work at nonprofits, inquire about funding and programs stability.

Variety of contacts

Employees at nonprofits have contacts with customers, government entities, and volunteers, making the people very versatile in dealing with different situations. In addition, many people are attracted to nonprofits because they are bright, passionate and committed to the organization. This combination can result in a very interesting workplace, albeit it can also get too dramatic. Since many employees have personal investments in the organization, disagreements and issues may become emotional. Understanding this situation can help in not taking things personally and not becoming part of the drama.

These are just a few pointers that are general in nature based on my experience. As you can tell, working at a nonprofit is not for everyone, but it can be very rewarding on a personal level to certain individuals. Salaries may not be as competitive as regular businesses, but perks like flex schedule, benefits and the ability to make a difference in a community are very attractive for many people.

 

Interested on CPE credits regarding nonprofits?  Online Practical CPE Courses

You can also check out my books:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide — Nominated for a  2016 McAdam Book Award

15 Quick Tips on Becoming a Great Consultant  — Free on Kindle Unlimited

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