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Nonprofit must pay payroll taxes

Nonprofits may be exempt from paying income taxes, but they still need to pay payroll taxes. Taxes withheld must be remitted to the government and 1099 must be filed for contractors.

When payroll taxes are not paid up, people working for the nonprofit may be personally liable for the money.  Yikes!  Read more about this at:

https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/what-happens-if-nonprofit-fails-pay-payroll-taxes.html

 

 

Restricted grants can be tricky

Look at ALL requirements of such grants, or you can get in trouble and may need to return the funds.  This can get really sticky.

 

http://www.thenonprofittimes.com/news-articles/u-chicago-donors-want-money-back/

Basic Internal Control for Nonprofits

The idea of separation of duties is not that obvious for many organizations, specially the ones with tight budgets, having one person handle too many functions because it seems simple and straightforward.  It’s usually a mistake.

The overall goal of separating duties is to have a system osf checks and balances to prevent losses and mistakes.

See the following articles about this topic:

https://sanfranciscohotelso.weebly.com/department/organizing-an-accounting-departiment

http://www.exemptmagazine.com/management_tips/separation-duties-effective-internal-financial-controls/

http://smallbusiness.chron.com/strengthen-office-billing-accounting-procedures-3933.html

 

 

How Nonprofit Tax Form Helps Management

The nonprofit tax form 990 contains interesting questions and requirements that should be reviewed by the board, not just by the financial people. I highly recommend to download and print the full form, even if the nonprofit doesn’t need to file it.  You can check out the core pages at https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f990.pdf

Take a look at the 990 page 6- “Part VI Governance, Management and Disclosure “section” and what is asked in this page– it may be an eye-opener for many.

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As you can see, this form raises good questions that may be used to improve operations.  According to the instructions on the top, saying “yes’ to lines 2 through 7b requires explanations and management should review these items carefully.

Line 2 is about identifying people who may personally benefit from the organization, a possible private inurement situation, usually a no-no for tax-exempt organizations or a hefty excise tax. The take away here — be careful with business relations involving board members.

Line 5 is about the loss of assets, an intriguing item on the tax return. A “significant diversion of assets” according to the IRS is embezzlement, fraud, theft or other inappropriate use of funds that is the lesser of 5% of current annual gross receipts, 5% of total assets at year-end, or $250,000.  According to a Washington Post report in 2013, more than 1,000 organizations marked “yes” here and most were for embezzlement.  Besides giving details of the problem, it’s a good idea to also disclose any new internal controls used after the problem was disclosed to prevent it from happening again. Note that this is NOT confidential information.

Line 11 specifically asks about top management getting copies of the tax return and how reviews are conducted.  The board must be engaged in this process, even if they are not financial people.  They cannot say that they don’t know or understand the tax returns.

Line 12 asks about conflicts of interest while line 13 is about whistleblowing, and line 14 covers document retention and destruction policy.  These lines underscore the need for written policies, and under the conflict of interest item, the need to monitor those regularly.  The idea is to say “yes” to all of these.  And the take away for management is to make sure these policies are followed up by procedures to make sure they’re not just “lip service.”

Line 18 reminds organizations to make certain forms available for review, as required by law.   Such reminders are all over the tax form, including reminding nonprofits about reporting contractors and gambling winnings.  Management could highlight those items and follow up on them with the finance department.

Also, note that the 990 asks for the nonprofit’s mission statement as the first line, and also on Part III- Statement of Program Services Accomplishments.  The idea here is to match the mission statement to the programs.  If an organization mission is to provide food for the homeless, but programs relate to buying books to schools, the nonprofit may be at risk to lose its tax-exempt status, which can be a major problem.

 

You can check the new edition of the book Nonprofit Finance A Practical Guide at https://goo.gl/M563u9

 

 

 

Kindle Version Available

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide is available now as a kindle book on Amazon:

http://amzn.to/2GF2E8W

 

#Nonprofit Jobs Tips

If you’re interested in working with a nonprofit, the best approach is to volunteer first to figure out the culture and style.  If that doesn’t pan out, then it’s time to search for jobs online.  Besides general job websites like monster.com, you could narrow your search to websites that specialize in the nonprofit sector. Below are some options:

https://www.workforgood.org/jobs/

https://www.idealist.org/

https://www.bridgespan.org/

https://www.philanthropy.com/

https://careers.councilofnonprofits.org/

http://nonprofit-jobs.org/

To get a job at a nonprofit, a passion for the organization programs is a must.  Read up on it online, including the latest news on it in the media to emphasize your interest.  Next are some issues I noted many people do when trying to get a job with a nonprofit.

Dress formally — Don’t assume that just because it’s a nonprofit, you can go in wearing sweatpants, for instance.  Proper dressing shows respect and professionalism. It’s better to overdress since most employers understand that people want to make a good impression.

Don’t talk badly about other organizations — This could be done saying that a place has a toxic environment or something more subtle.  Sometimes when giving examples of situations, people slip and show issues that should have been kept private.

Check tax returns at guidestar.com — Tax returns- 990- can show how the organization is doing financially, details about each program, and even salaries of board members and the five highest employees. Look at page 7- Part VII.

Happy job hunting!!

You can check the new edition of the book Nonprofit Finance A Practical Guide at https://goo.gl/M563u9

 

 

 

 

 

Nonprofit Payroll Risks and Controls

Some organizations run on volunteers only, but many need employees to perform certain tasks. Since having employees is costly, it’s no surprise that payroll is usually the biggest expense in the financial statements. Running payroll can be difficult, and while many organizations contract out outside payroll services, some prefer to process it in-house. Some key risks and controls with payroll are:

Risk: Time sheets could contain wrong information.

In many organizations receiving government funds, everyone files time sheets—even the president—to support charging grants “real” salaries rather than estimated/budgeted ones. Fortunately, many organizations use computerized timekeeping devices and time sheets that once implemented, reduce errors and confusion significantly.

A traditional internal control is for nonprofits to require supervisory approvals on time sheets (manual or electronic) to make sure hours and overtime are authorized. Auditors typically verify if the time charged to a grant was allocated and authorized properly. If the auditor finds errors or no time sheets, or time sheets with no approvals, the scope of the audit is likely to increase, becoming more expensive.

Risk: Employees may be fictitious.

Each employee should file the proper paperwork with human resources and should visit the HR department personally. I know of a case where a program supervisor “hired” a relative part-time who was a “ghost employee.” The nonprofit paid the “employee” for six months, while the supervisor cashed the paychecks.

It was only after a problem with the time sheet of this person (all fake) that the human resources manager got involved, and the fraud was discovered. So, it’s crucial for HR to see and meet with all employees, including part-timers to be sure they’re real and are actually working for the organization.

Risk: Unauthorized payroll changes or increases happen.

To make sure payroll records are correct, department managers should review and sign off payroll registers regarding their department at least once a quarter. Many department managers get the dollar amount of their department’s payroll expenses through regular internal financial reporting, but not the details.

So, having managers verify payroll numbers, overtime, sick days, vacations, etc. is very helpful in keeping it all correct. If they see someone claiming overtime that the manager didn’t approve, he or she can follow up on it.

Controllers or accounting managers should review payroll registers and change reports to make sure the persons running payroll aren’t paying themselves unauthorized overtime or salary increases—a fraud I witnessed that could have been prevented had the controller taken a look at payroll reports regularly.

Risk: Paying terminated employees by mistake.

One issue I often see with payroll relates to nonprofits paying terminated employees because payroll staff didn’t know about the terminations. Once paid, it’s tough to get the money back.  So, it’s important for human resources and managers to notify the payroll department when people quit or are let go. Staff may need to process final checks and update the payroll system.

Nonprofits may implement policies and procedures, including a checklist to follow when employees leave. Many details are involved, such as COBRA requirements that need to be handled correctly or the organization could be liable for fines.

Risk: Payroll information may leak.

Confidentiality is essential with payroll records. Nonprofits must keep all payroll-related documents, including time sheets, in safe, locked filing cabinets where only a few selected authorized personnel are allowed in. Similar security measures must be considered with access to the computerized payroll systems that should be very limited.

Nonprofits should hire people who are discreet and don’t discuss confidential matters with others in the organization. They should avoid using email when mentioning any sensitive payroll information because the system may not be secure enough.

Excerpt from book Nonprofit Finance – A Practical Guide Second Edition — https://goo.gl/M563u9