Kindle Version Available

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide is available now as a kindle book on Amazon:

http://amzn.to/2GF2E8W

 

Nonprofit Finance and Management Explained

The second edition of my book, “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide,” is out.  It includes detailed coverage of FASB update regarding reporting, details about liquidity and other details effective in 2018.   For example, the official financial reporting will show only two net assets, but internally, a nonprofit should maintain the three net assets separately and combine the temporarily and permanently restricted for reporting only.

Internal controls are covered in detail for cash, payables and computerized systems, giving ideas about how to minimize certain risks specific to the nonprofit sector.

Like the first edition, nominated for a McAdam Book Award, this second one has many examples and suggestions based on real-life experience, not just theories.  It was written with both the accountant and the non-accountant in mind, so that people of different backgrounds can benefit from the material and put it to good use right away.

You can check the new edition at https://goo.gl/M563u9

Setting up an Accounting Dept– Some Pointers

 

Many growing for-profit and nonprofit organizations find themselves with financial reports that make no sense, “forgotten” revenues and slow bill paying processes. They may be at a point where the part-time bookkeeper is over his or her head and flooded in work. So, what can you do? Below are some ideas to get you going.

Identify accounting tasks

You can look at accounting tasks and divide the work within these tasks. For example, a typical accounting department performs the following work:

  • Pay bills – Accounts Payable
  • Recognize revenues – Accounts Receivable
  • Process payroll – Payroll Administrator

Other tasks associated with an accounting department are: Cash management, bank reconciliations, budgets, financial reporting, and taxes. In large businesses, each of these functions is performed by one individual or more. In smaller firms, tasks are shared and the staff is supervised by a manager or a controller, who often is responsible for financial policies and procedures for the organization.

Analyze functions

Many businesses, including nonprofits, organize their accounting department using flowcharts and job descriptions. You don’t want to have the same task be performed twice or three times, but also,  you don’t want to miss an important process. Some nonprofits hire outside consultants to help them in organizing their department for maximum efficiency, while considering risks and controls. Unfortunately, this last option is usually used after a fraud or loss situation, when people are traumatized and willing to pay for professional advice.

Hire people with proper accounting skills

A common mistake is to assume that accounting is easy and can be done by the person who is a receptionist or works in another part of the organization. Without training or education, this person should be able to perform accounting functions of a full-charge bookkeeper. That’s a mistake and is not fair. Hire accounting people who have the proper education and experience. Accounting managers or controllers should have at least a bachelors’ degree in accounting. Someone with a four-year degree in business and a few years of accounting experience may also qualify.

Segregation of duties

As you organize the department, consider segregation of duties. For example, the person who opens the mail or receives money should NOT be the person who books revenues in the accounting system. If the person running accounts payable is also doing bank reconciliations, then a manager or controller should review the reconciliation and look at cashed checks. Why?  To have check-and-balances, internal controls, to prevent and correct mistakes or misappropriations.

Background checks 

Don’t forget to run background checks on all employees and volunteers dealing with accounting and cash functions. Make this a policy within your organization, so that people understand the situation as one of internal controls, not just paranoia.  Actually, many insurance companies require this step before issuing policies against theft and fraud.

Interested on CPE credits regarding nonprofits?  Online Practical CPE Courses

You can also check out my books:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide – Second Edition— First edition Nominated for a  2016 McAdam Book Award

15 Quick Tips on Becoming a Great Consultant  — Free on Kindle Unlimited

Prevent Volunteer Liability

If you’re around nonprofits, you know that many rely on volunteers for operations, special events, and programs.  According to the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, “about 62.6 million people volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2014 and September 2015.”

Usually, these people are good-hearted and do very good jobs.  However, we also have bad apples and those who misbehave or have incidents in the name of the organization. This creates a huge liability for the nonprofit that is counting all pennies to provide goods and services to the community.  It doesn’t matter that volunteers are not paid, they can still do damage that the nonprofit may be held liable for.

Actually,  “Good Samaritan” laws exist for volunteers in the case of personal liability, such as the Volunteer Protection Act of 1997. However, that doesn’t mean that the nonprofit is also covered under this act automatically. Better be safe than sorry.

Training

Usually, when things go wrong, the issue of proper training and oversight of volunteers is often questioned.  So, proper training and supervision is a must in any volunteer situation, including making sure they get an appropriate education and are placed in situations where they are qualified to be.  For example, if you run a swimming class, make sure the lifeguards are properly certified and trained to identify problems and take care of them. Swimming instructors should also have minimum qualifications for the job.  Just because it’s a volunteer situation doesn’t mean that standards can to be lowered.

Policies and procedures manual

Helping to maintain standards, many nonprofits use manuals to clarify policies and procedures, very similar to those created for employees.  Be sure that such manuals include sections about prevention of sexual harassment, safety and proper behavior in the workplace.  Also, consider policies and procedures about volunteer disciplinary actions when warranted.

Background check

One way to avoid unpleasant surprises is to do a background check on all volunteers, even if they cost a bit. It doesn’t mean that everybody should be perfect, but if someone has a riskier background with problems with the law, they may need to be more closely supervised and placed in jobs that don’t compromise the organization.  Also, many insurance companies require such background checks when they cover volunteer activities.

Insurance

Nonprofits must consider getting volunteer insurance policies to protect the organization from volunteers behaving badly or accidents.  Beware that because volunteers are unpaid, they are NOT usually covered by worker’s compensation insurance, and if something happens to them, the nonprofit may be on the hook for it. So, consider adding a rider or a separate policy to include volunteer while they work for the organization.

Volunteers are often wonderful and many organizations wouldn’t be able to offer their programs if it was not for them. However, they also present a liability to nonprofits that must be addressed. Since protecting nonprofits against these risks can be expensive, be sure to include these costs when preparing budgets, grant proposals or gift requests so that you have the required funds to protect the organization against any losses.

Check out my book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide- Second Edition” –– First edition Nominated for the 2016 McAdam Book Award