Nonprofit must pay payroll taxes

Nonprofits may be exempt from paying income taxes, but they still need to pay payroll taxes. Taxes withheld must be remitted to the government and 1099 must be filed for contractors.

When payroll taxes are not paid up, people working for the nonprofit may be personally liable for the money.  Yikes!  Read more about this at:

https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/what-happens-if-nonprofit-fails-pay-payroll-taxes.html

 

 

Kindle Version Available

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide is available now as a kindle book on Amazon:

http://amzn.to/2GF2E8W

 

Nonprofit Finance and Management Explained

The second edition of my book, “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide,” is out.  It includes detailed coverage of FASB update regarding reporting, details about liquidity and other details effective in 2018.   For example, the official financial reporting will show only two net assets, but internally, a nonprofit should maintain the three net assets separately and combine the temporarily and permanently restricted for reporting only.

Internal controls are covered in detail for cash, payables and computerized systems, giving ideas about how to minimize certain risks specific to the nonprofit sector.

Like the first edition, nominated for a McAdam Book Award, this second one has many examples and suggestions based on real-life experience, not just theories.  It was written with both the accountant and the non-accountant in mind, so that people of different backgrounds can benefit from the material and put it to good use right away.

You can check the new edition at https://goo.gl/M563u9

Setting up an Accounting Dept– Some Pointers

 

Many growing for-profit and nonprofit organizations find themselves with financial reports that make no sense, “forgotten” revenues and slow bill paying processes. They may be at a point where the part-time bookkeeper is over his or her head and flooded in work. So, what can you do? Below are some ideas to get you going.

Identify accounting tasks

You can look at accounting tasks and divide the work within these tasks. For example, a typical accounting department performs the following work:

  • Pay bills – Accounts Payable
  • Recognize revenues – Accounts Receivable
  • Process payroll – Payroll Administrator

Other tasks associated with an accounting department are: Cash management, bank reconciliations, budgets, financial reporting, and taxes. In large businesses, each of these functions is performed by one individual or more. In smaller firms, tasks are shared and the staff is supervised by a manager or a controller, who often is responsible for financial policies and procedures for the organization.

Analyze functions

Many businesses, including nonprofits, organize their accounting department using flowcharts and job descriptions. You don’t want to have the same task be performed twice or three times, but also,  you don’t want to miss an important process. Some nonprofits hire outside consultants to help them in organizing their department for maximum efficiency, while considering risks and controls. Unfortunately, this last option is usually used after a fraud or loss situation, when people are traumatized and willing to pay for professional advice.

Hire people with proper accounting skills

A common mistake is to assume that accounting is easy and can be done by the person who is a receptionist or works in another part of the organization. Without training or education, this person should be able to perform accounting functions of a full-charge bookkeeper. That’s a mistake and is not fair. Hire accounting people who have the proper education and experience. Accounting managers or controllers should have at least a bachelors’ degree in accounting. Someone with a four-year degree in business and a few years of accounting experience may also qualify.

Segregation of duties

As you organize the department, consider segregation of duties. For example, the person who opens the mail or receives money should NOT be the person who books revenues in the accounting system. If the person running accounts payable is also doing bank reconciliations, then a manager or controller should review the reconciliation and look at cashed checks. Why?  To have check-and-balances, internal controls, to prevent and correct mistakes or misappropriations.

Background checks 

Don’t forget to run background checks on all employees and volunteers dealing with accounting and cash functions. Make this a policy within your organization, so that people understand the situation as one of internal controls, not just paranoia.  Actually, many insurance companies require this step before issuing policies against theft and fraud.

Interested on CPE credits regarding nonprofits?  Online Practical CPE Courses

You can also check out my books:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide – Second Edition— First edition Nominated for a  2016 McAdam Book Award

15 Quick Tips on Becoming a Great Consultant  — Free on Kindle Unlimited

Working at a Nonprofit — Tips

Thinking about working for a nonprofit?  This sector is an important segment of the US economy with the Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting that in 2014 nonprofits accounted for 11.4 million jobs, 10.3 percent of all private sector employment. So, there are jobs out there within the nonprofit world, but it’s important to note some cultural issues that generally apply to most jobs within this sector. The fact that nonprofits don’t care about profits creates certain differences in the workplace that may not be that obvious.

Here are some pointers about the nonprofit environment to consider:

Supportive environment

While the for-profit business expects employees to be outgoing, ambitious, go-getters, the nonprofit organization looks for employees to get along, to be part of a team. To this end, nonprofits’ employees may receive more hand-holding and more support than in other environments.  Also, the workplace is likely to be more flexible and less formal with good benefits and time-off policies. This type of culture is suitable for those who want to be part of something bigger than themselves and value team processes and causes over personal ambitions.

More time to make decisions

Decisions, including major ones, are made in a team setting, built on consensus. Although there are a structure and managers, teamwork and team decisions are the norms. This means that many decisions take a long time to be made,  after meetings and considerations. Compared to the for-profit model, the nonprofit is more democratic, but it comes with the price of things moving at a slower pace. This can be frustrating for those used to the for-profit world, but it can also give you the opportunity to be heard.

External forces

Nonprofits usually depend on donors and grantors to operate and any changes within these groups can affect the organization in unexpected and swift ways. Employees need to change priorities quickly and to adapt to a new situation regardless of what the boss said just a few days before. This can be disconcerting and stressful to many, so employees need to be flexible and calm. If you’re looking for work at nonprofits, inquire about funding and programs stability.

Variety of contacts

Employees at nonprofits have contacts with customers, government entities, and volunteers, making the people very versatile in dealing with different situations. In addition, many people are attracted to nonprofits because they are bright, passionate and committed to the organization. This combination can result in a very interesting workplace, albeit it can also get too dramatic. Since many employees have personal investments in the organization, disagreements and issues may become emotional. Understanding this situation can help in not taking things personally and not becoming part of the drama.

These are just a few pointers that are general in nature based on my experience. As you can tell, working at a nonprofit is not for everyone, but it can be very rewarding on a personal level to certain individuals. Salaries may not be as competitive as regular businesses, but perks like flex schedule, benefits and the ability to make a difference in a community are very attractive for many people.

 

Interested on CPE credits regarding nonprofits?  Online Practical CPE Courses

You can also check out my books:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide — Nominated for a  2016 McAdam Book Award

15 Quick Tips on Becoming a Great Consultant  — Free on Kindle Unlimited