Kindle Version Available

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide is available now as a kindle book on Amazon:

http://amzn.to/2GF2E8W

 

Grant Audits

Many organizations receive grants and as expected, the federal government is concerned that the grants are spent properly, requiring audits of nonprofit recipients in addition to regular visits from the federal agency staff.

Instead of having a separate audit of each major grant, the Single Audit allows for one independent audit covering all federal grant contracts. It usually combines an audit of the organization and its grants. According to the National Council of Nonprofits, “a single audit covers the entire scope of the organization’s financial operations, ensuring that:

  • The financial statements are presented fairly;
  • The organization has an adequate internal control structure, and that
  • The organization is in compliance with any special government regulations/laws that apply to the specific type of federal funding the audit covers.”

These single audits are required if the nonprofit has spent $750,000 or more in federal funds (This threshold is likely to change in the future). Single audits are performed by independent CPA firms, which usually carry out both regular and single audits within the same engagement, releasing the results in two different reports—one for the regular portion and another for the grant audit.

During a single audit, a CPA firm evaluates the fairness of the financial statements and the schedule of federal financial assistance, which contains information about grants. To this end, auditors assess risk by reviewing prior findings, internal controls, and usage of contractors. Also, CPA personnel should consider the materiality of the funds, with major grants often getting most of the attention.

The Super Circular clarifies that auditors are responsible for following up on any deficiencies, also called “findings.” The nonprofit is supposed to respond with a corrective action plan. All of these documents are forwarded to the appropriate government agency.

Management should be aware of the cumulative grant spending because as the organization gets closer to the $750,000 in annual grant expenses, it should start budgeting for the single audit. It doesn’t come cheap, and grant funds may have to be adjusted to include this cost.

Note that nonprofits may need to have a regular, less detailed audit to comply with grantor or state rules. For example, the states of Connecticut and Hawaii require the filing of audited financial statements of charities with an annual gross income of $500,000 or more regardless of federal funding. This audit is less detailed and cheaper than the Single Audit, but it needs to be done.

 

Excerpted from Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide — Second edition –available at Amazon — https://goo.gl/M563u9

No Audit Freak Out

One of the most common audits of a nonprofit organization is the one performed by an independent CPA firm, usually, every year. This work may be a requirement for many grantors who want assurance that the funds have been used properly. Auditors may ask detailed questions or require certain information that may not be readily accessible. However,  there is no need to panic – be prepared and understand the process, which tends to be the same every year. Some tips below are to help you deal with the audit, which is one of those processes that many organizations go through, not just yours.

Tip #1– Sometimes staff with not much experience conduct the audit,  so, try to help them and show them the way, or they may get lost and the audit may take longer. The idea here is to have a helpful, not a defensive attitude. It can be frustrating to have to do this every year with different audit staff, but it’s part of the game. The good news is that it’s common for a former team member in an audit to return the following year as a Sr. or Supervisor so that you won’t have to train auditor again.

Tip #2- Be sure to have all the reports and items mentioned on the audit list, often given to the client a few weeks before the audit. If you don’t have all, call the CPA firm and let them know. Maybe you have other reports or items that can be alternatives to what’s on the list. Your audit may also be postponed until you have all the documents. Most accounting firms schedule nonprofit audits a few months during the year, so you may have some flexibility there.

Tip #3– Hire temp workers or volunteers on an as-needed basis to get all the documentation done, prepare worksheets, and help with filing, copying, and other tasks. Some organizations also use temps to assist with the day-to-day activities while the accounting folks are busy with the auditors. Your accounting staff may not be able to do their regular jobs and at the same time give auditors the attention and information they need. So, help at the right time can lessen the stress. Usually, having temps do a specific task, such as entering invoices for payment, works the best because the work is repetitive and training time is minimum. If you’re lucky to have an accountant on your board or as a volunteer, you can give him or her more involved financial tasks.

Tip #4– Communicate often with the manager responsible for the audit to identify issues or bottlenecks. Sometimes auditors use too technical language that the nonprofit staff may not understand and panic. Or maybe there’s a problem in finding information or explanations for certain transactions that you may be familiar with. The goal is to have a quick, clean audit with no major issues or conflicts. The quicker you know of problems, the smoother the process will be.  Make a point to contact the manager at least once every few days.

Tip #5- Notify everyone in the organization of the upcoming audit, since auditors may need to talk to people in other areas of the nonprofit, such as programs and HR. Warn managers and staff that they may need to present certain things to the auditors, including showing them confidential HR and payroll files and reports. Since auditors usually request the same items and calculations, such as vacation accruals every year, the requests shouldn’t be that surprising. But it’s always good to let people know beforehand.

Other Considerations -Freaking out with questions asked by auditors makes no sense— usually, they follow a pre-set program that may not fit your organization 100%, so you can explain to them the situation in a respectful way and offer alternatives.  Ask the auditors what goals they’re trying to get at.  Maybe they are looking at mitigating a risk that doesn’t really apply to your nonprofit, so let them know about it. CCH – Wolters Kluwer Audit guides, for instance, are very popular with many CPA firms that use their audit programs to guide them through this process.  If you’re interested, you could buy the guides, even if it’s expensive.

You can check the new edition of the book Nonprofit Finance A Practical Guide at https://goo.gl/M563u9

Checks & Balances Ideas for Nonprofits

Checks and balances are activities that protect organizations against errors and fraud. Also known as internal controls, these checks and balances provide an extra level of protection to the organization so that errors or losses are issues are caught and can be fixed or managed. Internal controls may also protect against fraud, including money theft. The good news is that you don’t  need to spend a fortune to have good controls at a small environment, nonprofit organizations.

Below are some ideas that can be implemented easily to protect your organization:

1- Have bank statements sent to the home of the executive director or a board member not involved in accounting. This person can take a quick look at the statement and at copies of checks for any unusual activity. Then he can give the statements to accounting personnel. Since many use online banking, someone apart from accounting can take a look online at bank transactions, even before statements are mailed out.

2- Always have two people counting cash. One person can count first while another one witnesses it, and then the other person counts it, writing down the total and then securing cash with a rubber band and/or an envelope. Keep it in a safe before depositing it in the bank, not in a drawer or in an obvious place. If needed, get a safe and have it bolted to the floor or wall.

3- Wire transfers must be done by two people- one to initiate the transfer and another one to approve it. Both could have passwords or PIN numbers for extra security. In the case of online payments where the bank pays someone directly, at least one person outside accounting should approve this before it is done. You can set this up with your bank.

4- Petty cash is kept in a safe, not in a desk drawer. Thieves know that drawers may contain petty cash and they go there first. Keep petty cash small and replenish often, checking on receipts.

5- Review bank reconciliations monthly with no delays and look at odd deposits that have not cleared the bank and old checks that are still outstanding. Check on deposit amounts on the books and on the bank to make sure they are the same. Also, look at checks being cashed to see if the amount and payee make sense. Many online banks allow you to actually see a copy of the check online, which can be very helpful.

6- Give receipts to everyone giving your organization money, especially cash. The receipt book should have duplicates so that the top receipt goes to the donor and the copy stays in the book. Depending on the amount, the person receiving the money could sign a receipt to make sure the organization has proper records.

7- If using faxed forms for donations or payments, mark the original faxed page as “Original” in red. This is especially important in credit card donations. Otherwise, it is too easy to charge a card multiple times for one donation. Make sure that donors know that faxed forms are NOT to be mailed. A good option here is to handle most cash inflows through a website.

8-People working with cash and accounting should take vacations. Many fraud cases are discovered when the perpetrator is home sick or away and someone else takes over for a few days. It’s good to have more than one person trained in certain accounting tasks so that if something happens, he or she can fit in with minimum training.

9- Make sure your insurance policy covers losses, such as fraud, just in case. This policy should also cover volunteers and part-timers. Be sure to double check with your insurance company regarding any special events or programs that may require a special rider.

10- Consider getting background checks on everybody handling financial tasks. It’s not that expensive and you can decide about hiring the person upon reviewing the background check. These checks are often required by insurance companies, so it’s usually not a big deal.

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide” –– Nominated for the McAdam Book Award

 

Grant Management Ideas

When a nonprofit receives grants, either from government entities or foundations, management needs to keep records well organized for questions or reviews. This can be tricky in the case of multiple funders with their own reporting and compliance issues. Even smaller funders may want to know what happened to their money and require some reporting, even if informal.  Showing disorganization and lack of controls may discourage donors to keep on giving, spelling disaster to nonprofits.

Below are some ideas that are likely to help you in this process.

  • Set up a summary sheet for each grant with reporting dates and other crucial information, such as education requirement of staff covered on each grant that is updated for each new grant and is reviewed every week to make sure nothing falls through the cracks. This could be done on paper or online, but make sure others within the organization have access to this information easily in case people go on vacations or leave the nonprofit. A template could be created so that all summary sheets look alike, making it easy to find information.
  • Make sure the accounting system captures revenues and expenses on each grant. You could identify grants through the chart of accounts by reserving a couple of digits towards specific grants or through “classes” or another method specific to your software. You may also need to train your accounts receivable and payable staff to recognize grant funds coming in and out, so they can code them properly. If not, you will have a nightmarish time providing reports to grantors and other interested parties.
  • Develop a good filing system. Be sure to download and print all OMB Circulars and other documentation relevant to grant control, including notes on meetings and phone conversations. Keep them filed and accessible at all times. You can make a summary listing of all non-allowable costs that you are likely to have and keep it handy.
  • Establish a budget for the organization based on grant budgets. Every grant-funded project should have its own budget numbers entered in your accounting system.
  • Review reports on each project monthly to identify errors and monitor financial compliance.  The Board and upper management usually receive summary reports, but other managers should review financial reports by grant source.
  • Review documentation on journal entries, accounting entries, associated with grants. Each expense and revenue should be justified with proper documentation. If you see a number that doesn’t make sense, ask to see the backup paperwork related to the number.

 

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide” –– Nominated for the 2016 McAdam Book Award