Need customer service? Tips to get satisfaction

Many small businesses need help in setting up new equipment or have problems with other purchases, prompting them to contact customer service. This could be issues with computers, software, or assembling furniture.

The idea is for customer service to provide guidance or solutions to the problem, which seems simple, but oftentimes customer service representatives don’t meet expectations. The customer service representatives can be pleasant and patient, but the experience can be exasperating with employees and small business owners spending hours or even days trying to resolve a problem, creating stress and possible loss of income.

So what can you as a small business owner, office manager or administrative assistant do to make sure you get the needed information or help you need? We all know about documenting the time of contact and name of the customer service representative, but what else can you do?

Here are some ideas you may consider when you contact customer service:

https://www.quill.com/blog/tutorials/how-to-get-satisfaction-with-customer-service.html

How to print on pre-printed forms using Excel

Have you ever found yourself with a pre-printed form that needs to be filled in?

Using a typewriter is out of the question. One solution is a template that you can use and reuse to print the required information on the forms properly. Following are specific steps on how to print on pre-printed forms by creating a template in Excel and using the columns and rows as guidelines.

To print a pre-printed form using Excel, you’ll use the following:

Excel guide worksheet – includes a grid
Excel template – includes text boxes
You will then follow these steps to print on your pre-printed form using Excel — see link

https://www.quill.com/blog/tutorials/how-to-print-on-pre-printed-forms-using-excel.html

 

Is Your Nonprofit Data Safe?

Many nonprofits keep confidential information on their computers, including sensitive data and items that cannot be lost. Membership or donor information, accounting data, and other confidential information should be safeguarded against snooping eyes.

A typical control here is to have a disaster preparedness plan, which includes a recovery strategy for the nonprofit’s functions. But that’s not enough.  Organizations should consider the following issues with software, hardware, and the cloud.

Software

Risks when dealing with software include unauthorized entry, loss of data, and confidentiality issues. Some internal control mechanisms to minimize these risks are:

  • Use anti-virus and firewall programs to prevent malware from infiltrating the system.
  • Do daily backups of all systems and keep the backed up file outside the premises.
  • Require IDs and passwords on all systems.
  • Acquire programs to identify and stop unauthorized entry using the Internet and other means.
  • Require information system’s authorization for program purchases to be sure the program is indeed needed and is compatible with existing software.
  • Once employees leave the organization, they should not have access to the nonprofit’s systems
  • Include security to prevent information systems personnel access to passwords or confidential information.
  • Create policies and procedures about computer usage and safety.

Hardware

The risks with hardware involve theft, maintenance, and obsolescence of the machines. Below are some controls to minimize these risks:

  • Place all equipment, including servers and printers, in a safe location.
  • Label all equipment with numbers and create a list of all equipment using the number and description.
  • Maintain this list, doing physical audits to identify equipment disappearances, losses and damages.
  • Centralize maintenance services and schedule them regularly.
  • IT management should approve purchases, retirement or sales of hardware.
  • Dispositions of old computers must be done carefully since they contain confidential information that may be recovered unless the nonprofit takes certain
  • Dispositions of old computers and peripherals must comply with laws to avoid poisoning the environment and possible fines.

Using the Cloud

Many nonprofits have been using accounting and other programs “in the cloud.” This means that organizations’ management and staff access these computerized programs through the Internet, making the software very convenient since employees can access the system anywhere as long as they have proper online connections, login IDs, and passwords.

-Organizations using old, unreliable equipment may benefit from the cloud since the data is not saved locally. If the server or individual computers stop working, the information is not lost and is still available.

However, there are risks associated with the cloud system. For example, the program may not be available online for long periods. So, before selecting a cloud system, check its reliability through Internet searches and word-of-mouth.

Once the organization decides to go online, management must trust the Internet provider to provide adequate security for the data, which may include donor information. Not surprisingly, data security of cloud systems is a major concern for both for-profit and nonprofit users.

Another issue with the cloud is the data transfer. If a nonprofit employs the cloud and then moves to another system, the existing data will need to be downloaded and transferred to another program. The cloud provider should allow for such transfers and help the organization in this matter, but some charge fees, so inquiries about this matter are beneficial to avoid surprises later.

Interested in CPE credits regarding nonprofits?  Online Practical CPE Courses

You can also check out my books:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide 2nd Edition— Nominated for a  2016 McAdam Book Award

15 Quick Tips on Becoming a Great Consultant  — Free on Kindle Unlimited

 

Another Nonprofit Exec in Jail

Not to be too paranoid here, but I just read an article about the Simi Valley Community Foundation whose former executive director stole over $45,000. According to the news, she forged a second signature on the checks used to pay her own mortgage.  Sadly, this embezzlement cost the organization its reputation as it had to stop operations, at least for now.  A total disaster.

It’s not clear how exactly the theft was discovered, but board members noted something odd, hired a forensic accountant to review the records, and went to the police with evidence of embezzlement. So, I give credit to the board for finding this out, but this theft had been going on for awhile.

So, what can a board do to prevent or identify financial fraud faster?

1- Knowledge –Get people on the board who understand financial matters and can ask the right questions. The board cannot have the obligation to fundraise and provide oversight only. Board members should have different backgrounds with least one person having the education and experience to really understand the information provided and ask good questions. Had this person been on the board of this Simi Valley nonprofit, the fraud may have been identified earlier.

2- Online Access –Have someone from the board check on the bank accounts of the organization online. He or she should review checks and deposits, looking for checks that don’t look right. Just having a policy about this review may deter fraud. Employees may think twice before forging signatures or doing something odd when they know that someone would be looking at the bank transactions regularly.

3- Pay attention –Listen to complaints from staff, donor, and vendors. Oftentimes, information that could be construed as gossip can be useful in pointing you in the right direction. People talk. Even though it’s not clear how the board of the nonprofit became aware of something wrong, my bet is that someone saw something and talked about it. Some nonprofits have started using hotlines for people to report possible fraud anonymously, a very good idea.

4- Variances –Pay attention to the actual vs. budget reports. Looking at this fraud, one may wonder how the $45,000 theft was classified and shown on the financial reports. The amount didn’t show up all at once, but it was likely classified as a budget item. So, if an overage is noted, the board should ask for back up documentations, such as bills.Talk only doesn’t explain financial issues.

5- System reports –Review new vendor/change vendor reports once a month to question any odd new vendor or changes. In this situation, the bank where the mortgage was paid to would have been added at a certain point to the accounting system. Had this report been reviewed, it may have flagged the bank as an odd vendor. Some accounting systems can send an email whenever a new vendor is added or changed, making this task automatic.

6- Bank reconciliations — Check on bank reconciliations, making sure they are done monthly. Keep an eye on deposits that are recognized in the accounting records, but don’t seem to be in the bank.  Also, look at the detailed outstanding checklist. This can be done online using the accounting system and can be emailed to someone at the board. If a check shows up at the bank, but not on the accounting records of the organization, it could be a red flag.

7- Self-reliance –Don’t count on auditors to notice embezzlement. Audits are designed to assure reasonableness of financial statements and they may identify fraud, but not always, especially when done by management. When something seems wrong, not it, and don’t wait for the auditors to figure it out. Insiders are the first people to note things that don’t seem right.

8- Education — Educate all employees on fraud and embezzlement. Nonprofits should have this topic on its policies and procedures documentation and not be embarrassed about it. Fraud happens not just with stealing funds, but in other areas as well, such as equipment theft and overtime pay without authorization. Just showing this awareness and clarity over fraud may prevent it in the first place.

It’s a shame that nonprofit boards must be always on alert for fraud and embezzlement, but that’s the reality of the situation.  Once a scandal happens, it’s hard for the organization to regain the trust and respect of donors, making it hard to move forward.

So, it’s time to talk about this issue openly and set up written policies and procedures with tasks specifically designed to prevent and identify fraud and theft.  The ideas presented here won’t assure boards that they are safe from this issue, but are steps in the right direction.  Each organization is different and I’m sure many will need more control features than the ones presented here.  The crucial point here is that fraud signs cannot be ignored by the board.

Interested on CPE credits regarding nonprofits?  Online Practical CPE Courses

You can also check out my books:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide — Second Edition 

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide — Nominated for a  2016 McAdam Book Award

15 Quick Tips on Becoming a Great Consultant  — Free on Kindle Unlimited

Practical Online CPE Courses

If you need CPE classes as a CPA or other financial professional, you may like my online self-study courses offered by many providers, including:

Financial Statements of Nonprofits are Different  — CCH- Wolters Kluwer

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide — CCH- Wolters Kluwer

Ethics for Enrolled Agents– CPE Depot

Tips on Becoming a Great Consultant- CPE247 — used as training book on CPA and consulting firm.

You can also check out my books:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide — Nominated for a  2016 McAdam Book Award

15 Quick Tips on Becoming a Great Consultant  — Free on Kindle Unlimited

 

 

Quick Tips on Nonprofit Financial Planning

Each organization is different, but every one of them is likely to face  challenges when planning for the future. Cash flow is crucial –no business, including a nonprofit, can survive without proper funding. However, many times people are concerned about the day-to-day activities of an organization and don’t pay attention to planning ahead. This issue has become even more important now that FASB released a new guideline requiring nonprofits to show how they can pay their bills in the next 12 months.

Check out 5 ideas that nonprofit managers may consider when conducting financial planning for an organization:

1- Use a budget

Budgets should be prepared before the year starts. Small organizations could use the prior year’s income and expense numbers as budget numbers for the following year. Once a budget is set up, then income and expenses should be compared to the numbers to be sure the organization is on target financially. Running a nonprofit without a budget is like shooting in the dark. It’s too easy to forget details and to end up with no money at the end of the year.

2- Pay attention to the timing of your cash flow

Cash is king in the nonprofit world. Without cash, an organization cannot pay its bills and must close or merge with another nonprofit. Timing is crucial, not just the amount of funding. For example, if an organization has a big bill to pay in August, but the money to cover this expense will be received in November, the nonprofit must deal with this shortage and start planning for it months in advance.

3- Consider getting a line of credit BEFORE you need it

Since funding can be cut or reduced with not much prior notice, nonprofits should get a line of credit from its bank. The best time to apply and get such line of credit is before the nonprofit needs it. This money could be used if funding is delayed or to cover a planned short-term cash shortage. Inquire about special lines of credit for nonprofits, which may have a lower interest rate and more favorable terms.

4- Educate your board of directors on financial literacy

Many organizations have very involved directors and officers, but they may not have the financial knowledge required to run a nonprofit. Therefore, such leaders should get a basic understanding of finance to evaluate reports and to hire and staff the accounting department properly. Some boards hire an outside consultant to come in a few hours a month or a week to supervise staff and resolve any problems before they become major. It’s an option, but the board must understand what is going on.

5- Allow for surplus

When planning, be sure to consider a cushion for the unexpected. This could be 2-10% of the total budget for a year, or an amount or percentage agreed by the board. This surplus, also known as “reserve,” is to be used for emergencies or unexpected costs, and is usually replenished once used up. The plan should be NOT to use these funds, but to have them, “just in case.”

Financial planning for a nonprofit can be a bit of a challenge, but it should be done to maximize the chances for survival and growth of a nonprofit. Without planning, small organizations may get by, but may not be ready for unexpected funding cuts. Making financial planning a priority can help your nonprofit to go in the right direction and make a difference in the community.

See more:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide – Second Edition– First edition was nominated for the 2016 McAdam Book Award

What you need to organize a nonprofit well – Article-Blog

Checks & Balances Ideas for Nonprofits

Checks and balances are activities that protect organizations against errors and fraud. Also known as internal controls, these checks and balances provide an extra level of protection to the organization so that errors or losses are issues are caught and can be fixed or managed. Internal controls may also protect against fraud, including money theft. The good news is that you don’t  need to spend a fortune to have good controls at a small environment, nonprofit organizations.

Below are some ideas that can be implemented easily to protect your organization:

1- Have bank statements sent to the home of the executive director or a board member not involved in accounting. This person can take a quick look at the statement and at copies of checks for any unusual activity. Then he can give the statements to accounting personnel. Since many use online banking, someone apart from accounting can take a look online at bank transactions, even before statements are mailed out.

2- Always have two people counting cash. One person can count first while another one witnesses it, and then the other person counts it, writing down the total and then securing cash with a rubber band and/or an envelope. Keep it in a safe before depositing it in the bank, not in a drawer or in an obvious place. If needed, get a safe and have it bolted to the floor or wall.

3- Wire transfers must be done by two people- one to initiate the transfer and another one to approve it. Both could have passwords or PIN numbers for extra security. In the case of online payments where the bank pays someone directly, at least one person outside accounting should approve this before it is done. You can set this up with your bank.

4- Petty cash is kept in a safe, not in a desk drawer. Thieves know that drawers may contain petty cash and they go there first. Keep petty cash small and replenish often, checking on receipts.

5- Review bank reconciliations monthly with no delays and look at odd deposits that have not cleared the bank and old checks that are still outstanding. Check on deposit amounts on the books and on the bank to make sure they are the same. Also, look at checks being cashed to see if the amount and payee make sense. Many online banks allow you to actually see a copy of the check online, which can be very helpful.

6- Give receipts to everyone giving your organization money, especially cash. The receipt book should have duplicates so that the top receipt goes to the donor and the copy stays in the book. Depending on the amount, the person receiving the money could sign a receipt to make sure the organization has proper records.

7- If using faxed forms for donations or payments, mark the original faxed page as “Original” in red. This is especially important in credit card donations. Otherwise, it is too easy to charge a card multiple times for one donation. Make sure that donors know that faxed forms are NOT to be mailed. A good option here is to handle most cash inflows through a website.

8-People working with cash and accounting should take vacations. Many fraud cases are discovered when the perpetrator is home sick or away and someone else takes over for a few days. It’s good to have more than one person trained in certain accounting tasks so that if something happens, he or she can fit in with minimum training.

9- Make sure your insurance policy covers losses, such as fraud, just in case. This policy should also cover volunteers and part-timers. Be sure to double check with your insurance company regarding any special events or programs that may require a special rider.

10- Consider getting background checks on everybody handling financial tasks. It’s not that expensive and you can decide about hiring the person upon reviewing the background check. These checks are often required by insurance companies, so it’s usually not a big deal.

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide” –– Nominated for the McAdam Book Award