Special Events– Pick up All Costs

 

Planning your next fundraising event? Now it’s the time to consider pesky financial issues that can derail your best efforts. Many fundraisers, focused on the tasks to make the event a success, end up forgetting some crucial activities and costs, such as the items discussed next.
1- Create a Budget for the Event

Be sure to create a budget with all costs way before the event takes place. I have seen an event budget for a gala where the cost of drinks was forgotten. So, it’s easy to miss important items and underestimate the event expenses. A way to avoid this problem is to have someone from accounting or finance department look at the budget numbers. Another way to prevent this issue is for development people to use a template budget form that contains common line items. Not every event is the same, but they usually have many expenses in common.

2- Consider Insurance Issues

Oftentimes events involve certain activities, such as a petting zoo that may require an insurance rider to be sure the event is covered. These riders are usually not expensive, but they are part of the overall costs of an event. Nonprofits can also ask insurance documents from the third-party to be sure all is covered and a rider is not necessary. Be sure to have this cost as part of the template budget form.

3- Look out for Sales Taxes

Many states, such as California, tax specific items within a fundraising event, such as certain auction items. Check your state and other government agencies to verify what is taxed in your jurisdiction. Tax rates may vary by state, county and city, so double-check this issue and consider it in your budget because it can take an unexpected bite of your proceedings. In California, the sales tax rate can be as high as 9.00% +of gross sales.  This tax may change, so double check with your state to make sure you’re OK.  Ask about sales tax waivers, if available.

4- Don’t Forget Overhead

Overhead costs are those that are not directly associated with the event. For example, an event carried on at the premises may involve rent or mortgage, fire insurance, maintenance, utilities and other administrative costs. These expenses are easily ignored because the event organizers don’t have to pay for those; they are often considered to be costs of the organization in general. To account for this “hidden: cost, some nonprofits charge a fee as rent to the event, while others charge a percentage of direct costs. The point is to note all costs associated with the fund-raising event.

5- Don’t Leave Wages out

Wages paid, including any overtime, to employees involved with the event should be part of the event budget, especially when dealing with large events where a lot of time is spent on planning and organizing. For instance, if someone is paid $30K in wages and works three months on an event, about $7,500 ($30,000 x 3/12) should be considered an event cost. Usually, a percentage, such as 20% is added to the gross wages to account for payroll taxes and benefits.

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide” –– Nominated for the McAdam Book Award

Quick Tips on Nonprofit Financial Planning

Each organization is different, but every one of them is likely to face  challenges when planning for the future. Cash flow is crucial –no business, including a nonprofit, can survive without proper funding. However, many times people are concerned about the day-to-day activities of an organization and don’t pay attention to planning ahead. This issue has become even more important now that FASB released a new guideline requiring nonprofits to show how they can pay their bills in the next 12 months.

Check out 5 ideas that nonprofit managers may consider when conducting financial planning for an organization:

1- Use a budget

Budgets should be prepared before the year starts. Small organizations could use the prior year’s income and expense numbers as budget numbers for the following year. Once a budget is set up, then income and expenses should be compared to the numbers to be sure the organization is on target financially. Running a nonprofit without a budget is like shooting in the dark. It’s too easy to forget details and to end up with no money at the end of the year.

2- Pay attention to the timing of your cash flow

Cash is king in the nonprofit world. Without cash, an organization cannot pay its bills and must close or merge with another nonprofit. Timing is crucial, not just the amount of funding. For example, if an organization has a big bill to pay in August, but the money to cover this expense will be received in November, the nonprofit must deal with this shortage and start planning for it months in advance.

3- Consider getting a line of credit BEFORE you need it

Since funding can be cut or reduced with not much prior notice, nonprofits should get a line of credit from its bank. The best time to apply and get such line of credit is before the nonprofit needs it. This money could be used if funding is delayed or to cover a planned short-term cash shortage. Inquire about special lines of credit for nonprofits, which may have a lower interest rate and more favorable terms.

4- Educate your board of directors on financial literacy

Many organizations have very involved directors and officers, but they may not have the financial knowledge required to run a nonprofit. Therefore, such leaders should get a basic understanding of finance to evaluate reports and to hire and staff the accounting department properly. Some boards hire an outside consultant to come in a few hours a month or a week to supervise staff and resolve any problems before they become major. It’s an option, but the board must understand what is going on.

5- Allow for surplus

When planning, be sure to consider a cushion for the unexpected. This could be 2-10% of the total budget for a year, or an amount or percentage agreed by the board. This surplus, also known as “reserve,” is to be used for emergencies or unexpected costs, and is usually replenished once used up. The plan should be NOT to use these funds, but to have them, “just in case.”

Financial planning for a nonprofit can be a bit of a challenge, but it should be done to maximize the chances for survival and growth of a nonprofit. Without planning, small organizations may get by, but may not be ready for unexpected funding cuts. Making financial planning a priority can help your nonprofit to go in the right direction and make a difference in the community.

See more:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide – Second Edition– First edition was nominated for the 2016 McAdam Book Award

What you need to organize a nonprofit well – Article-Blog

Accounting Helping You?

“Business is great” is not as effective as “Business has had sales of $10,000 per month,” and you presenting a financial report with the numbers on it. The more precise you are, the more credibility you have. And to be precise, you need a way to compile, classify data — that’s the role of accounting in businesses, including nonprofits.

Without accounting, you really don’t know if your business is doing well, and you cannot answer simple questions, such as how much you paid for office supplies this year. If you’re small, you may get away by using your checkbook as an accounting system, but as you grow, you will see how hard it can be to control expenses and analyze transactions without a more formalized system.  Accounting software is so affordable and easy to use now that it makes little sense to be operating in the dark — without proper financial information.

Below are some compelling reasons to employ some form of accounting:

Objectivity:

Accounting is objective, rational, unbiased with no feelings attached to it. That’s why it’s so valued by managers who want data that is real and not based on gossips or recollections. Since these numbers are backed up by documentation, oftentimes the accounting department becomes the go-to place for many areas within a business. Of course, we have accounting fraud and bad accountants that make up numbers, but overall, if you have a well-run accounting department with proper controls, the information is good and reliable.

Accuracy:

The more accurate the information, the better off you are. It may not be 100%, but often financial reports can be relied upon for management to make decisions and plan for the future. You may have good intuition and make decisions based on that, but having something to validate someone’s intuition doesn’t hurt. For example, if you thought you had a great month and received about $100,000 in revenues, but the accounting system tells you that you made only $30,000, then you may need to re-think your estimation or look for reasons why the accounting system shows such a low number — it could be something you didn’t consider.

Organization:

Managers often use accounting to find specific information. Accounting organizes data so that it can be found easily. For example, if you want to find how much you spent on food for a program, you can go to a food account and see all food expenses there, organized. Because of accounting, all relevant data is in one place, in a certain order. Without an accounting system, you will need to look for paper docs, add them up and maybe miss a couple of those, making this task clumsy and ineffective.

Many people are scared of accounting, assuming it’s difficult and cumbersome.  But in reality, it‘s not.  Many popular programs, such as QuickBooks and PeachTree, have free online tutorials and help groups, making accounting accessible to many people with no accounting background. From experience, often the accounting system becomes the main information system of an organization with people relying on it for other functions, such as a customer service or membership information. Because of this need, many accounting systems offer other modules or add-ons to gather information besides financial data.

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide- Second Edition” –– First edition was nominated for the 2016 McAdam Book Award.