What You Need to Know to Organize Your Nonprofit

Are you starting or organizing your nonprofit?  Any business needs a setup to operate effectively, and nonprofits are no different. A basic organization may be a no-brainer for some people, but may not be that obvious many as well.

As in any business sector, there is a need for an effective infrastructure working behind the scenes to keep things running smoothly. This is especially true in the nonprofit sector where operations support the organization in a number of functional areas, including:

·   office management,

·   accounting and finance,

·   administration,

·    human resources,

·   information technology,

·   marketing and development.

Across all of these functional areas, there is one objective: to make sure the organization is operating efficiently at its full potential in providing goods and services to a community.  If a bill needs to be paid, people within the organization will know where the bill should go to, not just into a pile that once in awhile someone looks at.  Having a well and clear organization where functions are performed in accordance with a plan is a must for any nonprofit to survive and flourish.

One of the challenges of nonprofits is to create and manage a structure that works well. Many founders of nonprofits are not managers and do not have a background in management. They are “program” people. They created the nonprofit to fulfill a goal, a dream that they are familiar with, but management is not their expertise.  Knowing the basic structure of a nonprofit can only help in setting up an organization that is functional.

It is important for founders and boards of directors to realize this issue and to find proper personnel or volunteers to fill out the needed spots. I have seen new, small organizations fail to follow their mission statements because they didn’t have a basic infrastructure, management, personnel to deal with proper insurance, and other risk factors.

A common structure is for nonprofit operations to be divided into three areas,  all supervised  by the board  of directors that could have an executive director to manage the daily operations.

  • Programs/ Services — MOST IMPORTANT 
  • Management and General — usually overhead
  • Fundraising

Identification of the three main areas of nonprofit operations is crucial in having proper accounting systems, internal controls, reporting, and management.  If you have an area of operations, it must follow this setup. Sometimes it’s not that obvious.  For example, someone working in contract compliance is most likely part of management, even though the work relates to programs as well.

BEWARE>>> Note that tax returns and most financial reports are classified by these three areas.

 

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide” –– Nominated for the McAdam Book Award

 

Checks & Balances Ideas for Nonprofits

Checks and balances are activities that protect organizations against errors and fraud. Also known as internal controls, these checks and balances provide an extra level of protection to the organization so that errors or losses are issues are caught and can be fixed or managed. Internal controls may also protect against fraud, including money theft. The good news is that you don’t  need to spend a fortune to have good controls at a small environment, nonprofit organizations.

Below are some ideas that can be implemented easily to protect your organization:

1- Have bank statements sent to the home of the executive director or a board member not involved in accounting. This person can take a quick look at the statement and at copies of checks for any unusual activity. Then he can give the statements to accounting personnel. Since many use online banking, someone apart from accounting can take a look online at bank transactions, even before statements are mailed out.

2- Always have two people counting cash. One person can count first while another one witnesses it, and then the other person counts it, writing down the total and then securing cash with a rubber band and/or an envelope. Keep it in a safe before depositing it in the bank, not in a drawer or in an obvious place. If needed, get a safe and have it bolted to the floor or wall.

3- Wire transfers must be done by two people- one to initiate the transfer and another one to approve it. Both could have passwords or PIN numbers for extra security. In the case of online payments where the bank pays someone directly, at least one person outside accounting should approve this before it is done. You can set this up with your bank.

4- Petty cash is kept in a safe, not in a desk drawer. Thieves know that drawers may contain petty cash and they go there first. Keep petty cash small and replenish often, checking on receipts.

5- Review bank reconciliations monthly with no delays and look at odd deposits that have not cleared the bank and old checks that are still outstanding. Check on deposit amounts on the books and on the bank to make sure they are the same. Also, look at checks being cashed to see if the amount and payee make sense. Many online banks allow you to actually see a copy of the check online, which can be very helpful.

6- Give receipts to everyone giving your organization money, especially cash. The receipt book should have duplicates so that the top receipt goes to the donor and the copy stays in the book. Depending on the amount, the person receiving the money could sign a receipt to make sure the organization has proper records.

7- If using faxed forms for donations or payments, mark the original faxed page as “Original” in red. This is especially important in credit card donations. Otherwise, it is too easy to charge a card multiple times for one donation. Make sure that donors know that faxed forms are NOT to be mailed. A good option here is to handle most cash inflows through a website.

8-People working with cash and accounting should take vacations. Many fraud cases are discovered when the perpetrator is home sick or away and someone else takes over for a few days. It’s good to have more than one person trained in certain accounting tasks so that if something happens, he or she can fit in with minimum training.

9- Make sure your insurance policy covers losses, such as fraud, just in case. This policy should also cover volunteers and part-timers. Be sure to double check with your insurance company regarding any special events or programs that may require a special rider.

10- Consider getting background checks on everybody handling financial tasks. It’s not that expensive and you can decide about hiring the person upon reviewing the background check. These checks are often required by insurance companies, so it’s usually not a big deal.

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide” –– Nominated for the McAdam Book Award

 

Accounting Helping You?

“Business is great” is not as effective as “Business has had sales of $10,000 per month,” and you presenting a financial report with the numbers on it. The more precise you are, the more credibility you have. And to be precise, you need a way to compile, classify data — that’s the role of accounting in businesses, including nonprofits.

Without accounting, you really don’t know if your business is doing well, and you cannot answer simple questions, such as how much you paid for office supplies this year. If you’re small, you may get away by using your checkbook as an accounting system, but as you grow, you will see how hard it can be to control expenses and analyze transactions without a more formalized system.  Accounting software is so affordable and easy to use now that it makes little sense to be operating in the dark — without proper financial information.

Below are some compelling reasons to employ some form of accounting:

Objectivity:

Accounting is objective, rational, unbiased with no feelings attached to it. That’s why it’s so valued by managers who want data that is real and not based on gossips or recollections. Since these numbers are backed up by documentation, oftentimes the accounting department becomes the go-to place for many areas within a business. Of course, we have accounting fraud and bad accountants that make up numbers, but overall, if you have a well-run accounting department with proper controls, the information is good and reliable.

Accuracy:

The more accurate the information, the better off you are. It may not be 100%, but often financial reports can be relied upon for management to make decisions and plan for the future. You may have good intuition and make decisions based on that, but having something to validate someone’s intuition doesn’t hurt. For example, if you thought you had a great month and received about $100,000 in revenues, but the accounting system tells you that you made only $30,000, then you may need to re-think your estimation or look for reasons why the accounting system shows such a low number — it could be something you didn’t consider.

Organization:

Managers often use accounting to find specific information. Accounting organizes data so that it can be found easily. For example, if you want to find how much you spent on food for a program, you can go to a food account and see all food expenses there, organized. Because of accounting, all relevant data is in one place, in a certain order. Without an accounting system, you will need to look for paper docs, add them up and maybe miss a couple of those, making this task clumsy and ineffective.

Many people are scared of accounting, assuming it’s difficult and cumbersome.  But in reality, it‘s not.  Many popular programs, such as QuickBooks and PeachTree, have free online tutorials and help groups, making accounting accessible to many people with no accounting background. From experience, often the accounting system becomes the main information system of an organization with people relying on it for other functions, such as a customer service or membership information. Because of this need, many accounting systems offer other modules or add-ons to gather information besides financial data.

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide- Second Edition” –– First edition was nominated for the 2016 McAdam Book Award.