Do You Know What a Pledge Really is?

Most nonprofit organizations are familiar with pledges, as people, businesses, and foundations make promises to give in the future. Many times these promises are the results of fundraising campaigns or appeals. Depending on the situation, the pledge could be for a general or specific purpose, such as for a new child-care program.

Pledges, both short and long-term, may be shown as “Pledges” or “Unconditional Promises to Give” on the Statement of Position.

Promises to give may or may not be real. For example, if a person notifies an organization that he is including the nonprofit in his will, this isn’t a pledge. The same situation exists if someone promises to pay a certain amount twenty years in the future—it’s not a pledge. In both cases, donors can easily change their minds; circumstances can change, making the promises hard to keep.

  • Promises to give must have no conditions to be recognized as real pledges.

Note that  conditions are different from restrictions:

  • Conditions determine if the amount will be given or not
  • Restrictions determine how to use the proceeds

Suppose there is a condition associated with a pledge — the money will be given only if a relative recovers from a serious disease. In this situation, the nonprofit records the pledge only after the condition is met, that is, the person recovers. This situation is tricky since a lot can change, and it makes good sense not to recognize this promise until it’s paid. Same if the condition is the occurrence of a major disaster in California— this pledge is conditional, and the nonprofit should not record it. Once a disaster hits California, then the pledge may be valid.  Managers should use common sense here.

Another example of a condition is a company matching donations made by employees. If an employee gives $10, the firm would also pay $10, matching the donor’s amount. As the employee donates, the condition on the firm’s pledge is lifted. Therefore, each time an employee pays, the organization recognizes a matching pledge.

The wording of a pledge is crucial to determine when a promise is conditional or just restricted. The key word in conditional pledges is “if.” Those are usually not recorded as real pledges by the nonprofit, although they may be filed for future follow up.

Once a pledge is determined to be valid, it can be unrestricted or restricted to a particular time or event, such as for a reading program happening in the future. The classification depends on donors’ intentions. A pledge made on a general appeal can be safely assumed to be unrestricted, while others specific to an individual program should be considered restricted.

Organizations must have pledge documents in writing whenever possible. If a donor doesn’t want to acknowledge the pledge, a thank you letter confirming the gift is a good idea. The letter can be simple and brief but should leave no doubt about the existence of the pledge and its intent.

Issues usually associated with pledges are collectability, pledges paid in installments and privacy of donors, all discussed next.

Collectability

As promises are to give in the future, pledges may not be all collectible, and most organizations aren’t going to sue to collect promised amounts because of PR issues. Therefore, by its nature, pledges are riskier than regular accounts receivable. As expected, a pledge due in a year is less risky than another one due in two or more years since a lot can happen in a year or longer.  Fundraising staff usually follow up on promises to pay, diplomatically, of course.

Due to the risk of default on pledges receivable, an Allowance for Uncollectible Pledges account is employed. It may be created and adjusted every year based on history. If an organization experiences 15 percent in uncollectible pledges, for instance, this percentage may be applied. It’s the same concept as the Allowance for Uncollectible Receivables in the for-profit world.

A strange situation with promises to give has popped up recently with a young, wealthy supporter promising to give a significant amount to an organization. As expected, people got excited, made a public PR deal with the pledge and started planning how to spend the money. Low-and-behold — it was all fake. The guy liked the attention, but was not wealthy and had no intention to fulfill the promise. The organization lost a lot of credibility with this deal. So, I recommend that nonprofits set up policies and procedures to evaluate significant pledges and to refrain from announcing it and making plans for it until all checks out.

Installments

Besides lump sum promises, nonprofits could also have pledges payable in installments; for example, a commitment of $25,000 payable at $5,000 a year for five years. In this case, organizations are to discount the payments to present value using a reasonable percentage. The discount is amortized as in the for-profit world. FASB ASC 820-10 (FASB 157) relates to this topic to be sure organizations evaluate pledges in a fair and acceptable manner.

  • Government and other grants aren’t considered to be pledges and are presented separately in financial statements.

So, if an organization receives a pledge of $30,000 payable in 5 years, apart is considered to be current pledge receivable, and the rest is non-current. In addition, revenue is recognized along with a discount and the allowance account. Don’t double count pledges – once as revenue when the promise is made and again when payments are made.

Privacy

Many times big donors want to keep their donations and personal information private. To this end, nonprofits should implement proper care so that the donor is acknowledged, donations are recorded, and the donor’s identity is kept secret. So, to assure privacy, donor databases need to be kept secure. Only a few people should possess access to the donors’ records.

As an example, a nonprofit organization I worked with had celebrities donating significant amounts of money, and they didn’t want their names, email addresses or other information available. Therefore, instead of inputting the real names and information in the database, the organization used the names “Anonymous 1,” “Anonymous 2,” etc. The nonprofit kept the real names and personal information under lock and key in a file cabinet accessible only by a couple of people. This low-tech setup worked well.

Note that a pledge is assumed to be a donation, not an exchange, so FASB ASU 2014-09 Revenue from Contracts with Customers doesn’t apply.

 

 

( Excerpt from “Nonprofit Finance A Practical Guide– Second Edition)

Prevent Volunteer Liability

If you’re around nonprofits, you know that many rely on volunteers for operations, special events, and programs.  According to the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, “about 62.6 million people volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2014 and September 2015.”

Usually, these people are good-hearted and do very good jobs.  However, we also have bad apples and those who misbehave or have incidents in the name of the organization. This creates a huge liability for the nonprofit that is counting all pennies to provide goods and services to the community.  It doesn’t matter that volunteers are not paid, they can still do damage that the nonprofit may be held liable for.

Actually,  “Good Samaritan” laws exist for volunteers in the case of personal liability, such as the Volunteer Protection Act of 1997. However, that doesn’t mean that the nonprofit is also covered under this act automatically. Better be safe than sorry.

Training

Usually, when things go wrong, the issue of proper training and oversight of volunteers is often questioned.  So, proper training and supervision is a must in any volunteer situation, including making sure they get an appropriate education and are placed in situations where they are qualified to be.  For example, if you run a swimming class, make sure the lifeguards are properly certified and trained to identify problems and take care of them. Swimming instructors should also have minimum qualifications for the job.  Just because it’s a volunteer situation doesn’t mean that standards can to be lowered.

Policies and procedures manual

Helping to maintain standards, many nonprofits use manuals to clarify policies and procedures, very similar to those created for employees.  Be sure that such manuals include sections about prevention of sexual harassment, safety and proper behavior in the workplace.  Also, consider policies and procedures about volunteer disciplinary actions when warranted.

Background check

One way to avoid unpleasant surprises is to do a background check on all volunteers, even if they cost a bit. It doesn’t mean that everybody should be perfect, but if someone has a riskier background with problems with the law, they may need to be more closely supervised and placed in jobs that don’t compromise the organization.  Also, many insurance companies require such background checks when they cover volunteer activities.

Insurance

Nonprofits must consider getting volunteer insurance policies to protect the organization from volunteers behaving badly or accidents.  Beware that because volunteers are unpaid, they are NOT usually covered by worker’s compensation insurance, and if something happens to them, the nonprofit may be on the hook for it. So, consider adding a rider or a separate policy to include volunteer while they work for the organization.

Volunteers are often wonderful and many organizations wouldn’t be able to offer their programs if it was not for them. However, they also present a liability to nonprofits that must be addressed. Since protecting nonprofits against these risks can be expensive, be sure to include these costs when preparing budgets, grant proposals or gift requests so that you have the required funds to protect the organization against any losses.

Check out my book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide- Second Edition” –– First edition Nominated for the 2016 McAdam Book Award

Checks & Balances Ideas for Nonprofits

Checks and balances are activities that protect organizations against errors and fraud. Also known as internal controls, these checks and balances provide an extra level of protection to the organization so that errors or losses are issues are caught and can be fixed or managed. Internal controls may also protect against fraud, including money theft. The good news is that you don’t  need to spend a fortune to have good controls at a small environment, nonprofit organizations.

Below are some ideas that can be implemented easily to protect your organization:

1- Have bank statements sent to the home of the executive director or a board member not involved in accounting. This person can take a quick look at the statement and at copies of checks for any unusual activity. Then he can give the statements to accounting personnel. Since many use online banking, someone apart from accounting can take a look online at bank transactions, even before statements are mailed out.

2- Always have two people counting cash. One person can count first while another one witnesses it, and then the other person counts it, writing down the total and then securing cash with a rubber band and/or an envelope. Keep it in a safe before depositing it in the bank, not in a drawer or in an obvious place. If needed, get a safe and have it bolted to the floor or wall.

3- Wire transfers must be done by two people- one to initiate the transfer and another one to approve it. Both could have passwords or PIN numbers for extra security. In the case of online payments where the bank pays someone directly, at least one person outside accounting should approve this before it is done. You can set this up with your bank.

4- Petty cash is kept in a safe, not in a desk drawer. Thieves know that drawers may contain petty cash and they go there first. Keep petty cash small and replenish often, checking on receipts.

5- Review bank reconciliations monthly with no delays and look at odd deposits that have not cleared the bank and old checks that are still outstanding. Check on deposit amounts on the books and on the bank to make sure they are the same. Also, look at checks being cashed to see if the amount and payee make sense. Many online banks allow you to actually see a copy of the check online, which can be very helpful.

6- Give receipts to everyone giving your organization money, especially cash. The receipt book should have duplicates so that the top receipt goes to the donor and the copy stays in the book. Depending on the amount, the person receiving the money could sign a receipt to make sure the organization has proper records.

7- If using faxed forms for donations or payments, mark the original faxed page as “Original” in red. This is especially important in credit card donations. Otherwise, it is too easy to charge a card multiple times for one donation. Make sure that donors know that faxed forms are NOT to be mailed. A good option here is to handle most cash inflows through a website.

8-People working with cash and accounting should take vacations. Many fraud cases are discovered when the perpetrator is home sick or away and someone else takes over for a few days. It’s good to have more than one person trained in certain accounting tasks so that if something happens, he or she can fit in with minimum training.

9- Make sure your insurance policy covers losses, such as fraud, just in case. This policy should also cover volunteers and part-timers. Be sure to double check with your insurance company regarding any special events or programs that may require a special rider.

10- Consider getting background checks on everybody handling financial tasks. It’s not that expensive and you can decide about hiring the person upon reviewing the background check. These checks are often required by insurance companies, so it’s usually not a big deal.

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide” –– Nominated for the McAdam Book Award