Working at a Nonprofit — Tips

Thinking about working for a nonprofit?  This sector is an important segment of the US economy with the Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting that in 2014 nonprofits accounted for 11.4 million jobs, 10.3 percent of all private sector employment. So, there are jobs out there within the nonprofit world, but it’s important to note some cultural issues that generally apply to most jobs within this sector. The fact that nonprofits don’t care about profits creates certain differences in the workplace that may not be that obvious.

Here are some pointers about the nonprofit environment to consider:

Supportive environment

While the for-profit business expects employees to be outgoing, ambitious, go-getters, the nonprofit organization looks for employees to get along, to be part of a team. To this end, nonprofits’ employees may receive more hand-holding and more support than in other environments.  Also, the workplace is likely to be more flexible and less formal with good benefits and time-off policies. This type of culture is suitable for those who want to be part of something bigger than themselves and value team processes and causes over personal ambitions.

More time to make decisions

Decisions, including major ones, are made in a team setting, built on consensus. Although there are a structure and managers, teamwork and team decisions are the norms. This means that many decisions take a long time to be made,  after meetings and considerations. Compared to the for-profit model, the nonprofit is more democratic, but it comes with the price of things moving at a slower pace. This can be frustrating for those used to the for-profit world, but it can also give you the opportunity to be heard.

External forces

Nonprofits usually depend on donors and grantors to operate and any changes within these groups can affect the organization in unexpected and swift ways. Employees need to change priorities quickly and to adapt to a new situation regardless of what the boss said just a few days before. This can be disconcerting and stressful to many, so employees need to be flexible and calm. If you’re looking for work at nonprofits, inquire about funding and programs stability.

Variety of contacts

Employees at nonprofits have contacts with customers, government entities, and volunteers, making the people very versatile in dealing with different situations. In addition, many people are attracted to nonprofits because they are bright, passionate and committed to the organization. This combination can result in a very interesting workplace, albeit it can also get too dramatic. Since many employees have personal investments in the organization, disagreements and issues may become emotional. Understanding this situation can help in not taking things personally and not becoming part of the drama.

These are just a few pointers that are general in nature based on my experience. As you can tell, working at a nonprofit is not for everyone, but it can be very rewarding on a personal level to certain individuals. Salaries may not be as competitive as regular businesses, but perks like flex schedule, benefits and the ability to make a difference in a community are very attractive for many people.

 

Interested on CPE credits regarding nonprofits?  Online Practical CPE Courses

You can also check out my books:

Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide — Nominated for a  2016 McAdam Book Award

15 Quick Tips on Becoming a Great Consultant  — Free on Kindle Unlimited

Measuring Program Success- Tips

Despite how wonderful your organization is, many funders expect you to prove that your programs work. So, this begs the question of how to measure success, a challenge with people knowing that they made a difference, but not being able to show it with factual data. As a CPA, my take on this is for people to quantify with numbers the ‘before” and “after” scenario as much as possible.

Before and After

The key here is to quantify the “before” as much as possible and make it a baseline.  For example, how many people attended an event before or now? How many calls were made to a center before or now? Set a baseline so that it can be compared and analyzed later on.

The other side is to show results over time and how the program is relevant, “the after.” For example, you could show that a certain drug rehab program started with 15 people and has grown over time with 25 people the following year and today has 100 clients.  However, be sure that you’re measuring significant items.  For example, maybe a better way to measure success in rehab would be how many people finish the program, not just number of clients at a certain point in time.  A nonprofit may have more clients, but if fewer are finishing the program, this may indicate a problem.

Objectives

To determine proper measurements, start with your program objectives. If your objective is to provide literacy services to adults, the number of students may provide a good measure. Or, maybe the number of students that pass a literacy test could make more sense.

A nonprofit that provides temporary housing for the homeless could consider success when the person moves on to permanent housing or when he/she gets treatment for addiction and gets a job.  It all depends on the program final objective. The yardstick to gauge impact could be the number of people in the temporary housing, or the number of people leaving such housing for something more permanent, or maybe how many new rooms have been added to accommodate this population. It all depends on the nature of the program.

Education and awareness

To implement a measurement system, staff and managers must be aware of the situation, so that proper data can be identified and tabulated. Since this may be new to many, be sure to explain the reasons for this “extra work “so that the staff not only understands its purpose but also give good ideas about how to measure impact meaningfully.

Set up a structure for people to work so that information is not forgotten or lost. You could use checklists, ask certain questions or fill out forms– all to document “before and after” on a systematic basis, not just at random. The idea is to institutionalize ways to evaluate programs. Knowing that there is a system in place is sure to please any new donor.

Keep it in writing

Keep all docs in writing with logs, notes, pictures and any pertinent information handy to show funders that your organization is indeed making a difference. Document major processes. For instance, if you provide a child care hotline, every call should be written up on a log with information about who took the call, time, etc. Keep close contact with providers that can give you backup and numbers about how many placements were made because of the hotline, for instance.

Keep the documentation in paper or digital format, safe and organized, so that it can be found and compiled quickly. This information should be available to both program and fundraising/development.  You don’t want people looking around for hours or days, trying to find a specific data that can help the organization grow and keep its funding.

Measuring program success can be a daunting task, but it’s usually doable, once the nonprofit defines what needs to be evaluated. Besides numbers, you can also use pictures to document baseline – “before and after”. This can be very effective when dealing with construction projects, for instance. Make sure to double check on the ways your programs are being evaluated.  Sometimes, a program or focus changes, but instead of changing, the evaluation methods stay the same. Be nimble here.

Check out the book “Nonprofit Finance: A Practical Guide” –– Nominated for the 2016 McAdam Book Award